The Journey of Doc Bar

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Here is exactly how one single horse transformed an entire breed forever: The Journey of Doc Bar.



If you’re fascinated in the origin of Quarter Horses, then you definitely ought to understand the journey of Doc Bar, the most historical Quarter Horse in US History. Doc Bar started his life in 1956 to a ranch owner, Tom Finley. The intent would be that the chestnut foal will be groomed towards becoming a sensation race horse. Nevertheless, that vision was temporary when Doc Bar won less than one hundred dollars on the race track.

If you’re fascinated in the origin of Quarter Horses, then you definitely ought to understand the journey of Doc Bar, the most historical Quarter Horse in US History. Doc Bar started his life in 1956 to a ranch owner, Tom Finley. The intent would be that the chestnut foal will be groomed towards becoming a sensation race horse. Nevertheless, that vision was temporary when Doc Bar won less than one hundred dollars on the race track.

Numerous people would think that the story of Doc Bar will stop here, but quite the opposite. Although Doc Bar was never going to be a race horse, he was a fantastic halter horse, cutting horse and sire. Although he was not the ordinary Quarter Horse, he changed the entire breed.

“Doc Bar won 12 first-place and a single second-place halter horse showing contests.”

This picture of Doc Bar was taken in March 1977 when he was 21 years old. Photo by David Brown of Eden Prairie, Minnesota

According to some research, the visual aspect of Doc Bar shed some light on his ability. He was deep through the heart and got a clean throat latch, had tiny fox ears, and a breathtaking head which he most likely inherited from his dam’s sire, Texas Dandy. Although Doc Bar did not possess the performance for the race track, he moved adequately enough to control cattle. His mere 15 hands made it possible for ropers to effortlessly catch a calf without hurting themselves. This showed just how minor changes in the breed could possibly be advantageous in both showing and working the animal.

Doc Bar won 12 first-place and a single second-place halter horse showing contests. Research shows that throughout Doc Bar’s short showing career he earned ten thousand dollars and reserve titles. Doc Bar ended up being sold in 1963 to Dr. and Mrs. Stephen Jensen of Double J Ranch in Paicines, California for $30,000. Which was a substantial amount of money during that time period!

A 1955 picture of Lightning Bar, the sire of Doc Bar, and owner Art Pollard of Tucson.

It was because of the strength, power, and ability of Doc Bar that led to the decision of utilizing him as a sire and from there on, numerous breeders wanted to mix the Doc Bar ancestry into their own breeding routine. Nevertheless, a document from B-Bar-C Quarter Horses shows that after halter horse contests started focusing on taller horses, Doc Bar’s position as a halter horse sire was at risk. That is when his owners opted to cross Doc Bar with two Poco Tivio Mares. The outcome ended up being an exceptional breed of cow horses.

As mentioned in B-Bar-C Quarter Horses, Doc Bar sired 485 foals that accumulated 2,492 halter points and 4,569.5 performance points, and AQHA Champions.
This phenomenal horse passed away in 1992 at the age of 36. a Year after his death he was included into the American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame in 1993.

As mentioned in B-Bar-C Quarter Horses, Doc Bar sired 485 foals that accumulated 2,492 halter points and 4,569.5 performance points, and AQHA Champions.
This phenomenal horse passed away in 1992 at the age of 36. a Year after his death he was included into the American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame in 1993.

Pedigree of Doc Bar

Doc Bar is evidence that often times disappointment in a certain breed could perhaps indicate that it’s meant to do greater things.

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